UC Irvine’s School of Humanities will offer a minor in Persian studies thanks to financial support from Farhang Foundation, a nonreligious, nonpolitical and not-for-profit entity established in 2008 to celebrate and promote Iranian art and culture.

Georges Van Den Abbeele, dean of the School of Humanities, is flanked by Assad Kazeminy, chair of Farhang’s Orange County Council, left, and Ali Razi, chairman of Farhang Foundation, as he accepts the foundation’s donation towards a Persian studies minor.

Georges Van Den Abbeele, dean of UCI’s School of Humanities, is flanked by Assad Kazeminy (left), chair of Farhang Foundation’s Orange County Council, and Ali Razi, chairman of Farhang Foundation, as he accepts the nonprofit’s donation toward a Persian studies minor.

UC Irvine’s School of Humanities will offer a minor in Persian studies thanks to financial support from Farhang Foundation, a nonreligious, nonpolitical and not-for-profit entity established in 2008 to celebrate and promote Iranian art and culture. Once finalized, the program will consist of courses already offered at UCI as well as new ones to be developed. The funding will also enable the hiring of a lecturer to teach these courses. The Persian studies minor will be available to undergraduate students in the 2015-16 academic year. “The School of Humanities is proud to work with Farhang Foundation in order to enhance the field of Persian studies, supporting UCI’s aspirations both to deliver a first-class and truly global curriculum and to serve important constituents of our local Orange County community,” said Georges Van Den Abbeele, dean of humanities. “Persian civilization is one of the oldest and most influential world cultures, still as vibrant today as it was three millennia ago, and we are very pleased indeed to make its achievements and heritage available for our students to study here at UC Irvine.” In the past, Farhang Foundation has collaborated with UCI’s Samuel Jordan Center for Persian Studies & Culture on various lectures and events, including the 2012 Shahnameh Festival. Persian, also known as Farsi, has been identified by the U.S. Department of State as a “critical language.”

 

 

 

 

 

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