Faculty

Dr. Arthur Lander

Explaining life through systems biology

UC Irvine is a hot spot for systems biology, a new approach to learning why the human body and other organisms work the way they do.

A Kenyan man completes transactions in cash and by cell phone.

The future of money: A glossary

Digital money or currency – a broad term describing any technology providing access to or even replacing traditional functions of money – is not limited to developing countries.

Airtime cards in China circulate as alternative currencies.

Money in the digital age

Are those crisp green bills wilting in your wallet? Coins collecting dust? As face-to-face transfers of money grow rarer in an increasingly digital world, cash is no longer king.

Michael Cahalan, and graduate student researcher Melanie Matheu

Circumventing autoimmunity

The immune system is the body’s military force, assigned to protect against disease and infection. But sometimes, the T cells and B cells that carry out this vital mission turn against their host and mistakenly attack healthy tissue in a process called autoimmunity.

Oladele Ogunseitan

Public health: The big picture

The field of public health looks at the big picture, and that image is coming into focus at UC Irvine as its Program in Public Health marks its greatest growth stage in its young, five-year history.

New Professors

UCI welcomes new faculty

Experts on everything from reconstructing the human hand to interpreting the U.S. Constitution have joined the UC Irvine faculty in the last year.

A student juggles apples while registering to vote

UCI election events

There’s no shortage of political opinion at UC Irvine, and a number of campus groups and student organizations have organized events where those opinions can be heard.

Ron Carlson

Rhode Island loves Carlson

Call it the little state with the big reach. Rhode Island is touching UC Irvine in a big way by selecting Ron Carlson’s “Five Skies” as its statewide reading pick for 2009.

Timothy Osborne

Guarding against toxins

Toxins in food often have a bad, bitter taste that makes people want to spit them out. It’s one way the body defends itself.

Can exercise make kids smarter?

This is the second in a three-part series of essays by UC Irvine pediatrician Dr. Dan Cooper on children and exercise.