UCI News

Daily Pilot, Sept. 21, 2017
UC Irvine to debut brain research center with advanced MRI machine
Craig Stark, FIBRE’s designer and director and a professor of neurobiology and behavior, said the research facility will be studying a variety of brain-related topics, including cognition, aging, dementia, effects of radiation, depression, schizophrenia and autism. UCI’s advanced Siemens MRI machine “is the tool we have that can allow us to look into the human brain non-invasively.” [Subscription required, you can request an electronic copy of the article by sending an email to communications@uci.edu.]

The Wall Street Journal, Sept. 21, 2017
The Globe and the Kettle
Jeffrey Wasserstrom, chancellor’s professor of history at UCI, writes: “On the whole, though, Ms. Rappaport’s book is one of relevance to us all. Her section on the Opium War highlights the complex ways that a country’s dependence on a commodity, as well as individual addictions to that commodity, can lead to trouble on an international stage” … “ “A Thirst for Empire” is an excellent resource for those seeking to understand it.” [Subscription required, you can request an electronic copy of the article by sending an email to communications@uci.edu.]

Science, Sept. 22, 2017
Death watch for climate probe
Much can still be done with GRACE’s archival data, says Isabella Velicogna, a geophysicist at the University of California, Irvine. For example, Velicogna and her colleagues recently used GRACE to observe a counterintuitive effect of ice loss in Greenland and Antarctica.

The Washington Post, Sept. 20, 2017
Our dangerous, idiotic national conversation
Now, Richard L. Hasen of the University of California at Irvine offers a commentary on Volokh, “Cheap Speech and What It Has Done (to American Democracy),” forthcoming in the First Amendment Law Review. Hasen, no libertarian, supports campaign-spending regulations whereby government limits the quantity of campaign speech that can be disseminated.

The Economist, Sept. 21, 2017
China’s demographic divisions are getting deeper
As a whole, China has too few young adults relative to the size of older generations, meaning it will not have enough workers to support its pensioners (or children) properly in the future … Wang Feng, of the University of California, Irvine, dubs the problem “the Balkanisation of Chinese demography”. [Subscription required, you can request an electronic copy of the article by sending an email to communications@uci.edu.]

Previously “In the News”