UCI IN THE NEWS – MARCH 15, 2017

Los Angeles Times, March 15, 2017
Why Warren Buffett is investing in an airline industry he once called a death trap
“I would think that Buffett is right in viewing the industry as having gained the stability needed to warrant a big investment,” said Jan K. Brueckner, an economics professor at UC Irvine.

U.S. News & World Report, March 15, 2017
Learn Whether Now Is the Time to Apply to Law School
At the University of California, Irvine, the University of Denver, Lewis & Clark and the University of Maryland, incoming students can connect with practicing attorneys who serve as academic and professional mentors.

Omaha World Herald, March 13, 2017
Laser-etched credit and debit cards begin to replace raised-type kind; issuers say they’ll last longer
Cultural anthropologist Bill Maurer said that’s all fairly easy to explain.  “Practices around payments are really durable, and they last over time,” said Maurer, dean of the School of Social Sciences at the University of California, Irvine, and director of the Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion there.

Alaska Public Media, March 13, 2017
Climate scientists worry NOAA cuts will hinder Alaska weather forecasting
Zack Labe, a doctoral student with the University of California-Irvine’s Department of Earth System Science, studies sea ice to among other things determine whether it influences weather in the middle latitudes.  “Budget cuts to the satellite network would not only affect climate monitoring but would also affect weather monitoring,” Labe said. The satellites are essential for researchers and weather forecasters here and worldwide, he
dded.

The Desert Sun, March 13, 2017
California cases of alleged voting by illegal immigrants opened in 2016: Zero
The miniscule number “undercounts the amount of potential fraud because a lot of it would not be reported,” said Richard Hasen, a professor of election law at the University of California, Irvine. It also doesn’t include investigations that could be underway if initiated by prosecutors in the state’s 58 counties.  Still, Hasen said, “I see no evidence that voter fraud is a major problem in California.”

Previously “In the News”