UCI News

Scientific American, Dec. 3, 2019
Cookie-Cutter Suburbs Could Help Spread Sustainable Yards
New approaches are more likely to appeal to residents if the changes explicitly help property values, says Matthew Freedman, an economist at the University of California, Irvine, who has studied how HOAs impact housing prices and neighborhood conformity. “We don’t see a lot of HOAs encouraging activities that will have benefits that extend beyond their community,” he says. “But they do encourage plants that limit runoff, and that directly affects the immediate neighborhood.”

Orange County Business Journal, Dec. 2, 2019
Henry Samueli and the Art of Giving
“We set up the foundation right away, knowing that we would give back as soon as the stock had value. Fortunately, it had a lot of value, so we started writing checks–big checks, [Henry] Samueli said during an event last month at the UCI Merage School of Business. … As for the University of California, Irvine, his former colleague and former dean of its engineering school Nicolaos Alexopoulos roped him in soon enough. Over the past two years, Samueli and his wife Susan, have donated $200 million to build the College of Health Sciences at UCI …. [Subscription required, you can request an electronic copy of the article by sending an email to communications@uci.edu.]

Medscape, Nov. 27, 2019
High-Protein Diet Could Be Harmful, Even for Healthy Kidneys
Many previous studies have shown that a high-protein diet may harm kidney function, and this is why nephrologists recommend patients with known early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) stick to a low-protein diet. But people who have mild CKD of which they are unaware or those at high risk may follow the trend of eating a protein-rich diet because they believe it is healthy, say [UCI Professor] Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, MD, PhD, and colleagues in an accompanying editorial. [Subscription required, you can request an electronic copy of the article by sending an email to communications@uci.edu.]

The Washington Post, Dec. 2, 2019
Racially divisive parties have more voters now, but voters aren’t becoming more racist. What explains this?
In the United States, John Sides, [UCI Associate Professor] Michael Tesler and Lynn Vavreck conclude in what has become the definitive study of the 2016 election that “Trump’s victory was never predicated on a wave of growing hostility or prejudice; rather it relied on his willingness to openly appeal to an existing reservoir of discontent about changing American society and culture … making it more strongly related to how” some citizens voted. [Subscription required, you can request an electronic copy of the article by sending an email to communications@uci.edu.]

Los Angeles Times, Dec. 3, 2019 (Opinion)
Opinion: Why China won’t let Hong Kong become another Tiananmen
Jeffrey Wasserstrom, professor of history at UC Irvine writes, “When historians of the future tell the story of 2019, they would do well to focus on two things: how the many protests around the world this year differ from those of 1989 and how fear of the revolutions born in that era haunt some contemporary autocrats.” [Subscription required, you can request an electronic copy of the article by sending an email to communications@uci.edu.]

Previously “In the News”