UCI News

Associated Press, Aug. 28, 2016
Mussels disappearing from New England waters, scientists say
The Gulf of Maine’s once strong population of wild blue mussels is disappearing, scientists say. A study led by marine ecologists at the University of California, Irvine found the numbers along the gulf coastline have declined by more than 60 percent over the last 40 years. … “It would be like losing a forest,” said biologist Cascade Sorte, who with her colleagues at the university conducted the study and recently published their findings in the Global Change Biology journal.

Zocalo Public Square, Aug. 27, 2016
Election-law expert Richard L. Hasen
Richard L. Hasen is the Chancellor’s Professor of law and political science at the University of California, Irvine. … Before giving a lecture at Zócalo on the effects of loose campaign finance laws on American politics, he talked in the Zócalo green room about idolizing Jimmy Carter, podcasting, and watching dads getting hurt on hoverboards.

Better Homes and Gardens, Sept. 2016
Total recall
Caffeine goes beyond giving you a wake-up call: It can also enable you to store memories better.  “Our theory is that caffeine blocks a receptor in the brain that could impair memory,” says Michael Yassa, Ph.D., associate professor of neurobiology and behavior at University of California, Irvine.

The Washington Post, Aug. 27, 2016
Ever wondered about the big plaque of Alexander Hamilton near Dupont Circle?
Shortly after taking office in 1933, Franklin Roosevelt shut down all commercial banks for a week − the “national banking holiday.” The idea, said Gary Richardson, an economics professor at the University of California, Irvine and former historian of the Federal Reserve, was to give the government time to figure out how to address the problem, deciding which banks were strong enough to reopen and which had to be liquidated.

12 Eyewitness News, Aug. 29, 2016
UCI mussels research
A study led by marine ecologists at the University of California, Irvine found the numbers of mussels along the New England coastline has actually declined by more than 60 percent over the last 40 years.

Previously “In the News”