UCI News

NBC News, Aug. 28, 2019
A trip to Mars could cause brain damage. Here’s how NASA aims to protect astronauts.
Dr. Munjal Acharya, a radiation oncologist at the University of California, Irvine, and the study’s lead author, said radiation exposure “affects cognitive function and behavior at the cellular level,” adding that the exposure might make it hard for astronauts to respond effectively to unforeseen circumstances or stressful situations. The research suggests that at least one in five astronauts sent to Mars would return with severe deficits in cognitive function, he said. [Charles Limoli is a co-author of the new study.]

The Washington Post, Aug. 26, 2019
Now begins the biggest challenge of the Amazon fires: Putting them out
“That’s why there is a huge focus on prevention,” said Paulo Brando, a professor of physical sciences at the University of California at Irvine who has spent years working on the issue. “Once these fires spread in gigantic areas, they are very hard to contain.” [Subscription required, you can request an electronic copy of the article by sending an email to communications@uci.edu.]

Orange County Business Journal, Aug. 26, 2019
UCI Cybersecurity Group Will Simulate Attacks
A University of California-Irvine cybersecurity effort is planning a “test range” to simulate and evaluate various types of cyberattacks, the group’s executive director said. … UCI Cybersecurity Policy & Research Institute’s Bryan Cunningham said the effort will let the group “pretend we’re all different kinds of attacker groups” targeting electronic victims. [Subscription required, you can request an electronic copy of the article by sending an email to communications@uci.edu.]

Los Angeles Times, Aug. 28, 2019
Infighting threatens Westminster’s leadership and its Vietnamese American council majority
Lou DeSipio, a UC Irvine professor of political science who studies ethnic politics, said that his students called his attention to the drama in Westminster. “I’ve never seen this broad of a recall, which I believe is unprecedented in California,” he said. “Certainly, everyone has their principles, but the nature of a small group like that is they should be able to work out their differences.” [Subscription required, you can request an electronic copy of the article by sending an email to communications@uci.edu.]

The Wall Street Journal, Aug. 28, 2019
Don’t Ignore This Message About Slack
The trouble is that Slack hasn’t yet shown that companies are adopting it exclusively. As a merely supplemental platform, its benefits have limits. Checking yet another form of communication can cause further disruptions at work and cut even more into productivity, as several studies, including one from the University of California-Irvine, have shown. Users and their employers might ultimately get fed up. [Subscription required, campus-wide access provided by UCI Libraries. Sign-up here: WSJ.com/UCILibraries]

Previously “In the News”